Hidden Gems: Hong Kong’s Up and Coming Districts For Savvy Home Seekers

Posted in Ask An Estate Agent

The city’s luxury districts are well-documented, but when it comes to acquiring new residences, investors would do well to consider the unexpected.

When it comes to Hong Kong property in 2020, the adage of “nothing new under the sun” is a truthful one. The city’s geographical contraints mean there’s little chance for the birth of an entire district along the lines of King’s Cross in London, or New York’s Hudson Yards. The closest Hong Kong has to that kind of massive re-imagining is the ongoing development of the former Kai Tak airport. Stay tuned.

Hong Kong property
(Image credit: Kai Tak Oasis)

So when it comes to identifying Hong Kong’s most underrated, overlooked or emerging luxury districts, buyers and agents need to think creatively — and look to the future. That means considering where value can be found, and embracing the evolving definition of ‘luxury’ itself. Vibrant street life and walkability have become key considerations for buyers and tenants, neck-and-neck with the longstanding question of accessibility. With the prospect of periodic city-wide lockdowns increasingly becoming the norm, we’ll all be eyeing escapes at home — like those found in massive country parks and generous hiking trails on the western side of Hong Kong island and the water on all sides in the south. In 2020, such options on your doorstep are the definitive embodiment of luxury.

For decades, the Holy Trinity of premium living has been (and remains) The Peak, Repulse Bay and Mid-Levels, Central. These neighbourhoods are traditional bastions of space, setting and exclusivity. In recent years, Sai Kung, Clearwater Bay and, to an extent, Deepwater Bay have lobbied for a place on that list: Thanks to their close proximity to water, low housing density and increasing ease of access. But as buyers (and renters) get younger, and social habits evolve, the concept of what goes into a luxury home is morphing similarly into something more design-driven, sustainable, urban and authentic. No longer are marble bathrooms enough.

Hong Kong property
Repulse Bay

The first sign the tide was turning was the rush to Kennedy Town in 2009 (market watchers will recall the MTR Corporation announced a much-watched extension that same year). A few intrepid small investors and developers looking at the long view had already started making plans (The Merton was completed in 2005), and before long values were rising. People moved in and more elegant residential towers went up (Cadogan). Those were followed by innovative restaurateurs, cafés and retailers. Before long Kennedy Town had become gentrified and was bucking for luxury status.

Hong Kong property

There are plenty of corners in Hong Kong now flirting with a similar pattern: involving a mix of value, connectivity, and lifestyle. Lantau Island, now with sleek developments like Whitesands and Botanica Bay, is an overlooked luxury district — one which could garner fresh attention for the resort-like lifestyle it offers. For the adventurous, undervalued Aberdeen and its ingrained waterside community make for a smart long game investment — one that will mature when the South Island Line West connects it to the rest of the city. The direction Kai Tak heads in — on what will ultimately be the Tuen Mun MTR line — is anybody’s guess, though the Oasis development is a solid indication of what’s to come.

Hong Kong property
(Image credit: Regalia Bay)

Stanley, Mid-Levels West and Pok Fu Lam currently lead the pack on the value front. Prices in conventional high-end locations — the aforementioned trinity — have remained resilient (as is usually the case in times of geopolitical instability) but just a few steps away are pockets which offer tremendous value. In many cases, they’re even preferable. Stanley, for example, features beaches and greenery; a solid track record of lifestyle amenities; hip waterside dining; and a forthcoming bypass that puts it just 25 minutes away from Central — the same distance as nearby Repulse Bay. The difference being an approximate 10-15 discount on the former. Stanley flats in Regalia Bay or 22 Wong Ma Kok Road rival much of what’s available in Repulse Bay (and surpass them when you consider it’s not necessary to get in a car to run to 7-Eleven).

But Hong Kong’s real unsung hero could be Sham Shui Po. Mainly known once upon a time for pirated DVDs, fabric stores and the Golden Computer Arcade, it’s now emerging as an ultra-hip district — and doing so under the radar. Down the road, one MTR stop from re-energised Cheung Sha Wan, the streets there are now cluttered with restaurants, chic cafes, underground art spaces and young tech start-ups, many inspired by the (now-closed) Savannah College of Art and Design. As luxury continues to becoming increasingly design-led, regenerated flats in older buildings with personality are becoming more appealing to the modern, high-flying tenant. Sham Shui Po is at a similar point in its development curve as Kennedy Town 15 years ago, and the slow trickle of revitalised industrial buildings and residential towers — naturally, with a little boost from the Urban Renewal Authority — suggest the area is getting ready to kick-off its reinvention as a contemporary luxury hub.

Victoria Allan
Victoria Allan is the founder of Habitat Property, a real estate company specialising in the sale and leasing of luxury property in Hong Kong. Prior to establishing Habitat in 2001, Allan held the position of Commercial Leasing Director at Colliers Jardine. She has over 25 years experience in residential and commercial real estate across a variety of global markets — including Hong Kong, Australia, Canada and the US.

Mid-Levels Neighbourhood Guide: Prime Properties and Cultural Trails

Posted in Where to Live

Whether you’re looking to invest in a stable, proven district in the face of uncertainty, or looking to buy yourself a bolthole for premium living in Hong Kong, you’ll want to look to Hong Kong’s Mid-Levels. Here’s our beginner’s guide to the area.

Being infamous as the world’s priciest property market with an average housing price in the city clocked in at US$1.2 million (HK$9.3 million) according to CBRE’s 2020 Global Living Report, much of Hong Kong’s ultra-luxe homes belong to a trifecta of The Peak, Repulse Bay and Mid-Levels. High barrier to entry aside, these areas have traditionally offered the luxury of space, sumptuously appointed homes, and are known as the most exclusive areas to live in the city.

If you’re looking for a home with a view, there is no better place to admire the picture-perfect panorama of Victoria Harbour than the privileged vantage points offered by the Mid-Levels and The Peak. The Mid-Levels in particular stretches from the east overlooking Happy Valley, across Central and Western along the mid-ridges of Victoria Peak, whilst the Peak area itself sees standalone mansions and spacious condos dotted along the higher portion of the mountain.

Situated in the midst of abundant greenery with walking trails, historic sites, high-end restaurants and tranquil cafes all at arm’s reach, the Mid-Levels is also easily accessible to the shopping and business areas of Central, Wan Chai and Causeway Bay — all just a quick drive or walk away. It’s also well connected to a network of prestigious local and international schools, attended by the children of some of Hong Kong’s more affluent families.

If money is no object, there are many pluses to obtaining a luxurious pied-à-terre in the most traditionally affluent part of Hong Kong — though thankfully, there are also a growing number of accessible entry price points — particularly scattered around Mid-Levels West — that make it feasible for young professionals and small families. We outline the perks of the Mid-Levels below.

Residences to know

With high-rise buildings cutting through the mountains, Mid-Levels residences all boast grandstanding panoramic views of the city and the Victoria Harbour — with equally impressive price tags to match.

The Opus, 53 Stubbs Road
(Image credit: Wiki Commons)

For a glimpse of what is synonymous with the opulence of the area, look to The Mayfair, one of the most well known developments in the area, just 10 minutes away from Central and the Peak. Completed in 1998, the 30-storey property looms large in the heart of Mid-Levels with units sized from about 2,100 to 4,500 sq.ft. and equipped with harbour-facing balconies. Its last transaction was in 2016, where a 2,838 sq.ft. apartment sold for HK$155 million.

Mid-Levels is also home to residences that spotlight incredible architectural craftsmanship. Look to The Opus and The Morgan. The Opus was Frank Gehry‘s first residential project in Asia in collaboration with Ronald Lu & Partners. The 12-storey building is located on Stubbs Road on the east side of Victoria Peak, with comfortably sized units ranging from 6,000-6,900 sq.ft., including two duplexes with pools.

The Morgan is equally if not even more impressive, high above Mid-Levels with stunning views of the city, the Robert A. M. Stern Architects-designed tower has scored multiple accolades since the building’s completion in 2016. Featuring 34 duplexes and a penthouse on the 30th floor, it exemplifies the epitome of contemporary luxury living within our concrete jungle.

The Morgan Sky Duplex - terrace
The Morgan on 31 Conduit Road
(Image credit: Lit Ma Common Studio Ltd.)

Nevertheless, the Mid-Levels also offers small to mid-sized homes. Slated for completion in March 2021 is Central 8: Located in Mid-Levels West with 99 units ranging from 181 to 491 sq. ft, it plans to offer both studios or one- to two-bedroom apartments for singles and young families.

Education

St. Paul’s Co-educational College

The Mid-Levels boasts some of the most prestigious schools in Hong Kong, ranging from preschool level to higher education. To the west, the Mid-Levels is home to the esteemed University of Hong Kong. Some of the finest secondary schools also loom large in the Mid-Levels, including St. Paul’s Co-Educational College, St. Paul’s College for boys, St. Stephen’s Girls’ College as well as international schools under the English Schools Foundation such as Island School. For kindergartens, the International Montessori School of Hong Kong and the Woodland Montessori Academy both offer competitive advantage to fledgling leaders of the future.

Around the Neighbourhood

A predominantly residential neighbourhood, the Mid-Levels is interspersed with small businesses catered towards families such as tutoring centres and mom-and-pop diners, all steps away from leafy walking trails, parks and cultural sites showcasing some of Hong Kong’s British colonial past.

Ohel Leah Synagogue

(Image credit: Avi Alpert/Flickr)

Neighbouring the Jewish Community Center and Jewish Recreation Club, Hong Kong’s Modern Orthodox Synagogue has been the nucleus for the social and religious activities of the Jewish population in Hong Kong for over a century. Established in 1901–1902, the Ohel Leah Synagogue commemorates Leah Sassoon, the mother Sassoon brothers Jacob, Edward and Meyer — part of a wealthy merchant family often referred to as ‘the Rothchilds of the east’ — who donated the land on which the Synagogue stands. Nearby, check out Sabra at the Jewish Community Center, which serves kosher international dishes and traditional Jewish deli favourites. The restaurant also offers a full Shabbat dinner, which requires advanced booking (note that Sabra is currently closed until August 2020).

Ohel Leah Synagogue, 70 Robinson Road, Mid-Levels, Hong Kong, +852 2589 2621

Hong Kong Museum of Medical Sciences

(Image credit: Ystsoi/Flickr)

Hong Kong’s resilience in the fight against infectious diseases dates back hundreds of years, and this history is succinctly showcased at the Hong Kong Museum of Medicinal Sciences. It was formerly a Bacteriological Institute built in response to the 1894 Plague outbreak. These days, it’s an informative museum that outlines the scientific discoveries across Chinese and Western medicine throughout the years, as well as a shining example of built-heritage conservation.

Hong Kong Museum of Medicinal Sciences, 2 Caine Road, Mid-Levels, Hong Kong, +852 2549 5123

Dr. Sun Yat-sen Museum

(Image credit: Edwin.11/Flickr)

As the name suggests, this museum is dedicated to Dr. Sun Yat-sen, influential philosopher, politician and physician, and the founding father of the Republic of China. As the place where Sun was educated for his secondary and tertiary education, Hong Kong is considered the bedrock of his early revolutionary thought, and traces his activities in Hong Kong from establishing the Xing Zhong Hui (Revive China Society) in 1894 to the founding of the Republic of China in 1912. Housed in the historic Kom Tong Hall — the original residence of local businessman Ho Kom-tong, half-brother to Sir Robert Ho Tung — the museum opened in 2006 to commemorate the 140th birthday of the icon. The museum is located just a hop and skip away from the Sun Yat-sen Historical Trail.

Dr. Sun Yat-sen Museum, 7 Castle Road, Mid-Levels, Hong Kong, +852 2367 6373

Flagstaff House Museum of Tea Ware

Dating back to 1846, Flagstaff House is considered the oldest surviving example of Western architecture in the city. It used to be the residence of the commander of the British forces during Hong Kong’s years under colonial rule. Eventually it was converted into a museum dedicated to the art of tea appreciation and ceramics. Aside from a permanent collection and revolving special exhibition, don’t miss the opportunity for a meal at Lock Cha Tea House — at one of the city’s most picturesque locations of the venerated tea brand — where you can step back into the past and sample delicious dim sum and a wide selection of freshly brewed teas.

Flagstaff House Museum of Tea Ware, 10 Cotton Tree Drive, Central, Hong Kong, +852 2869 0690

Bowen Road Fitness Trail

(Image credit: Marc van der Chijs/Flickr)

Running along the lower slopes of Victoria Peak is the Bowen Road Fitness Trail, which is popular with runners and dog walkers in the area. Breathe in the fresh air provided by the lush foliage of palm, vine and bamboo as you go on your daily jog, whilst taking in the view of the streets of Wan Chai far below. Although a manageable 2.5km route, the fitness trail is paved, and fully equipped with restrooms, playgrounds, park benches and emergency phones. Looking for a date idea with your other half? Find the stairs to Lover’s Rock above the trail — dubbed the ‘Bowen Road Lover’s Stone Garden,’ tradition has it that women go up to pray for fortune in love and marriage. Whether you’re superstitious or not, the landmark is still worth a visit for its incredible vista over the city.

Bowen Road Fitness Trail, Bowen Road, Mid-Levels, Hong Kong

The Central–Mid-Levels Escalator

(Image credit: Wiki Commons)

Being the longest outdoor covered escalator system in the world, the escalator conveniently links the Mid-Levels to the main shopping and dining areas in SoHo and Central. On a cooler day, try hopping on the escalator from start to finish — discovering SoHo’s different restaurants and bars, upstairs pampering destinations, heritage sites and hidden alleys up and down each lane.

Central–Mid-Levels Escalator, Central, Hong Kong

The Hong Kong Zoological and Botanical Gardens

(Image credits: Michael Neil Thomas/Shutterstock)

With over 300 animals residing here including orangutans and flamingoes, Hong Kong’s Zoological and Botanical Gardens provides a fun-filled day for families with young kids. Interact with birds and mammals at a tour through its aviaries, greenhouse and the fountain terrace garden. Guided tours about primate and bird care and conservation efforts are also available.

The Hong Kong Zoological and Botanical Gardens, Albany Road, Central, Hong Kong, +852 2530 0154

Staff Writer

Should you Invest in Hong Kong’s Property Market during CoViD-19?

Posted in Ask An Estate Agent

Unless you’ve been living under a rock these past 10 months, you’ll know that Hong Kong’s real estate sector has been experiencing its sharpest decline in nearly a decade. Amid the worst economic contraction in the region’s history (8.9 percent in the first quarter), commercial investments have proven particularly vulnerable — hit by the lethal one-two combo of months-long anti-government protests, then the global coronavirus pandemic.

Data released by investment firm CBRE indicates these factors (and the resulting slump in consumer confidence) contributed to one of the worst quarters for retail property transactions since 2009: only 20 deals, roughly amounting to HK$7.5 billion, have been made so far this year.

By contrast, though there remains an air of caution among consumers, experts’ prognosis of the city-wide housing market is steadily improving. To make sense of the government’s quantitative easing policies, the latest price data, and ultimately, whether you should wait longer for the market to bottom out; we phoned up Victoria Allan — an ex-director at Colliers who now manages her own premium realty firm, Habitat Property, here in Hong Kong.

Let’s start with an overview: what sort of shape was Hong Kong’s real estate market in at the end of 2019 versus around the time that the first wave of coronavirus infections hit? What are the most noticeable changes?

VA: Towards the end of 2019, the city’s property market already wasn’t in a great way — given all of the (ongoing) political protests. Those had a significant unsettling effect on the market, pushing prices down across the board by about 10 percent. As for CoViD-19, market sentiment was already becoming negative as early as Christmas 2019 — that’s because it was playing out in conjunction with a wider global downturn brought on by the pandemic.

Given the current position of the housing market, have there been any changes in government policy that have made it easier to purchase residential property?

VA: As a result of the pro-democracy protests, the HKSAR government actually altered the policy for first-time homeowners: enabling them to gain easier access to property valued at under HK$10 million (by reducing the amount they’d have to pay in their deposit). At this time, no further adjustments in policy have been made to take into account the economic impact of CoViD-19. It’ll be interesting to see if the government relaxes these policies. However, having had tight restrictions on lending over the last decade, there’s very little debt in the Hong Kong property market which can help to support price levels.

What have some of the most obvious impacts been on buyers since the property market was hit by Covid-19?

VA: We’re seeing many buyers seize the opportunity to invest — especially where it’s for self-use. Market prices are being discounted by 10-20 percent (as compared to 12 months ago), so it’s actually an opportune moment for those who want to purchase their first property or sell the one they currently own and upgrade. Sellers also need to keep a closer eye on personal liquidity, so it’s easier to negotiate with them for a reasonable price.

Hong Kong property
The sprawling penthouse in Repulse Bay has come down to a price (negotiable) of HK$95 million over the past two months. (Image source: Habitat Property)

In the case of new homeowners, it’s a great time to enter the market with either a small investment or property for self-use. Ditto for listings where the price is below HK$10 million — that’s a huge opportunity to buy at lowered prices whilst being able to finance at a higher level (i.e. up to 90 percent financing for properties priced below HK$8 million; and 80 percent for those below HK$10 million).

Hong Kong property
The Villa Helvetia penthouse includes amenities made possible by the surrounding environment of Repulse Bay – including a terrace, private garden and fibre optic cabling. (Image source: Habitat Property)

Foreign investors are also starting to re-examine the Hong Kong property market, as experts generally see it as a market with more medium-term stability than Europe and the U.S. As the number of CoViD-19 cases increases in those regions, their economies are projected to be worse-hit than Hong Kong.

Continuing in that vein, could you give a brief rundown of the opportunities that investors now have that mightn’t necessarily have been available if they were purchasing pre-CoViD-19?

VA: Absolutely! In addition to the reduction in market prices that has averaged 10-20 percent, another side effect of the public health emergency has been that a more varied range of properties has come up for sale. Even though we’re seeing some evidence that suggests the market hasn’t yet bottomed out, most buyers can be confident that if they buy now they’ll be able to take advantage of some discount.

Which residential districts in Hong Kong do you think best support these findings about the current market?

VA: For the purposes of easy illustration, the most dramatic reductions representing good ‘value’ can be found in high-end areas like Repulse Bay. The median price for a three-room apartment in developments like Ruby Court, for instance, has come down to HK$53 million.

Hong Kong property
Buyers and nascent investors will find the best, most dramatic bargains in non-urban neighbourhoods such as Repulse Bay (pictured) or Stanley.

To wrap up: can we get you to make a top-line prediction about the market’s trajectory over the next 6 to 8 months?

VA: Personally, I think that the market is already starting to stabilise — there’s more confidence locally given that Hong Kong seems to have the total number of CoViD-19 cases under control. However, the region’s borders still haven’t been reopened — which raises the possibility (however remote) of a third wave of cases. Last but not least, we have the reoccurring issue of protests: that’s bound to keep a lid on consumer sentiment and pricing. All told, I think the market could fall another 5-10 percent in 2020 before making a full recovery.

Hong Kong property

Victoria Allan is the founder of Habitat Property, a real estate company specialising in the sale and leasing of luxury property in Hong Kong. Prior to establishing Habitat in 2001, Allan held the position of Commercial Leasing Director at Colliers Jardine. She has over 25 years experience in residential and commercial real estate across a variety of global markets — including Hong Kong, Australia, Canada and the U.S.

Randy Lai

Building Spotlight: Tai O Heritage Hotel, Hong Kong

Posted in What to Buy

Far from Hong Kong island’s maddening crowds, overlooking rustic stilt houses and agile fishing craft to and fro across Lantau, travellers will uncover glimmers of Hong Kong’s colonial past — lovingly restored, beautifully preserved and worthy of an extended residence. In our latest instalment of Building Spotlight — a monthly series spotlighting the structures which have come to define the city’s cultural legacy — we retreat to Tai O Heritage Hotel, a Grade II historic building set against the most westerly point in Hong Kong.

QUICK FACTS
  • Address: Shek Tsai Po Street, Tai O, Lantau Island
  • Built: 1902
  • Site Area: N/A
  • Gross Floor Area: 1,000 sq. mtr.
  • Price per square foot: N/A

The Tai O Heritage Hotel is perched atop a hilly outcrop overlooking the village of the same name: a historic Hong Kong fishing community that has populated western Lantau for over three centuries. Managed by the Hong Kong Heritage Conservation Foundation (HKHCF), the property consists of 9 rooms which occupy the site of the former Tai O police station. The original station was built in 1902 — among the first of its kind to be set up in the New Territories. Over the centuries, this expanse of coastline was a frequent target for pirates conducting smuggling runs in and out of Mainland China, making it a point of sustained interest for British naval forces, and later, Hong Kong’s colonial-era police force.

Tai O Heritage Hotel

For much of the 19th century, the station was only minimally staffed, yet during the 80s the total number of police posted here grew to 180 (due to increasing triad activity across the westerly part of Lantau). By 1996, a significant decrease in crime across the HKSAR resulted in the station being downgraded to a patrol post, before it was eventually vacated in 2002. In 2008, the HKHCF earmarked the complex as one of seven buildings that would be adapted for commercial reuse under the ‘Revitalising Historic Buildings through Partnership’ scheme. An estimated HK$64.9 million was allocated to the station’s redevelopment: as a boutique hotel that opened to the public in late 2011.

Tai O Heritage Hotel

Within the hotel grounds, the two structures originally housing the Tai O police station have been preserved: there is a main black and an outhouse, both two stories high, connected by an overhead footbridge on the first floor. The main block meshes traditional Chinese building techniques with Western architecture, illustrated in a tiled ‘pan-and-roll’ roof, cantilevered eaves and large, airy French windows punctuating the building’s facade. The outhouse was added in the 60s to enhance the station’s self-sufficiency: outfitted with multiple kitchens, a drying room and an interpreter’s office. To capitalise on the station’s hilltop location, a watchtower was constructed at one end of the outhouse.

Today, these historic spaces have mostly been converted into a handful of tastefully appointed spaces. Suites and guestrooms all bear the name of a vessel or rank used in the marine police. ‘The Commissioner’, formerly the station’s charge room and armoury, has been rebuilt as a suite with two vanities and a private terrace; while the ‘Eagle’s Point’ takes the on-site canteen and transforms it into a roomy, 375 sq. ft. abode — ample space for two intrepid vacationers and their children.

Tai O Heritage Hotel

In a city prone to incessant commercial redevelopment, the Tai O Heritage Hotel stands out for its rare blend of significant cultural heritage and commercial viability. But don’t take our word for it: in 2013, UNESCO conferred the coveted Award of Merit on the property, citing an “extensive cultural mapping effort that has greatly informed the restoration work and…enhanced social and economic opportunities provided by the building’s new use”. Now that’s the tagline to a hotel getaway that we can really get behind.

To learn more about the property or make a booking, visit Tai O Heritage Hotel online.

Randy Lai

Top 5 Questions to Ask Your Real Estate Agent Before You Buy

Posted in Ask An Estate Agent

The relationship you have with your real estate agent is one of significance. Especially since they are the advisors, the experts, and the business partners, that will help you through important transaction(s). It is therefore critical, not only to have done careful planning and research, but also to ask the right questions. To ensure we get to these questions right, we’ve enlisted Chris Liem, the Owner and Principal of luxury real estate Engel & Volkers Hong Kong to help us with the best fact-finding questions you need to ask your real estate agent before you commit to buying.

1. Recent transactions

Make sure to ask your real estate agent if there have been any recent transactions in the building. This will give you a reference to relative pricing in the building and last sale. Remember that floors will differ in value too, as do different unit shapes; for instance A units versus B units, one will be the most popular in the building.

2. Building age and management fees

The age of the building, along with the management fees, will affect how much capital will be required for your purchase. So it’s best to ask these questions beforehand so you don’t get any surprises.

3. Comparable buildings

Most good agents will be able to list comparable buildings for you. So you should ask to get that point of reference which will make your decision to buy or sell much easier.

4. Summary

Ask your agent to summarise your request. It seems so simple, but I promise this will save you a lot of time later.

5. Where would you buy?

Putting the agent in your shoes will usually reveal whether they think the property is worth the investment. After all, they will usually have the best idea of value. For example, you can ask them: “If you had the money, where would you buy right now?” or “Where is the best location for living?” and “Where is the best property price wise?”.

Fontaine Cheng
Born and bred in London, Fontaine is a self-proclaimed foodie with extensive experience in the luxury lifestyle landscape. When not exploring the world — discovering cultures and tasting new dishes — she can be found sipping a nice cup of tea (or G&T) hoping to adopt a puppy.

6 Luxury Properties to Purchase in Hong Kong Right Now

Posted in What to Buy

Whether a townhouse by the seaside or a penthouse on The Peak, Hong Kong boasts a number of desirable luxury properties. Below, we round up six prestigious residences to consider if you’re house hunting in Hong Kong.

Poggibonsi

Conveniently located in the heart of Discovery Bay, the new Poggibonsi offers stunning sea views, striking architectural design and a choice of layouts from studios to four-bedroom residences. Its three towers, with a total of 196 units, sit on a hill above the bays of Yi Pak Wan and Sam Pak Wan and provide views extending from Discovery College to Victoria Harbour to Hong Kong Disneyland. Inside, each luxurious unit has been designed to maximise natural light and comes equipped with premium fixtures and appliances from leading brands such as De Dietrich. poggibonsi.com.hk

Mont Rouge

Kerry Properties’ latest prestigious residential development at Beacon Hill is a private sanctuary nestled among natural greenery at 9 Lung Kui Road. Mont Rouge comprises five villas, 14 detached houses and two towers with 26 apartments. Unit sizes range from 1,700 to 7,100 square feet. Its elevated hillside location provides spectacular south-facing views of Kowloon Peninsula, Victoria Harbour and The Peak, while Festival Walk and Kowloon Tong MTR station are just 10 minutes’ travel time away.
themontrouge.com.hk

Mount Nicholson

Taking pride of place atop The Peak in the west of Hong Kong Island, Mount Nicholson is a gated community of 19 unique detached houses and 48 spacious apartment units with saleable areas that range from 4,186 to 9,950 square feet. The top-quality design and construction is the result of collaborations among world-leading architects and designers including Robert A.M. Stern Architects, Yabu Pushelberg, Wong & Ouyang and LWK + Partners. Amenities and services include a large-scale clubhouse, ballroom, theatre and SAS-trained security guards.
mountnicholson.com.hk

The Carmel

Situated against a lush hillside in Tai Lam, Wing Tai Properties’ townhouse project The Carmel comprises individual townhouses (most with private gardens and garages) as well as 130 residential units from studio to four-suite penthouses. Renowned landscape architect Jean Mus has created three spectacular vertical gardens that blend seamlessly with the development’s graceful design.
thecarmel.com

8 Deep Water Bay Drive

Luxury residential development 8 Deep Water Bay Drive is built along the contours of prestigious Shouson Hill. Typical apartments range from three to four en-suite bedroom units with saleable areas of 2,865 to 4,214 square feet, while the state-of-the-art clubhouse facilities include an interconnected 20-metre indoor pool and 25-metre outdoor pool. The private enclave also features a 22,000-square-foot garden.
8deepwaterbaydrive.com

Grand Homm

Unveiled in September, Goldin Group’s first luxury property development in Hong Kong, Grand Homm, aims to redefine opulence in the residential market. The Ho Man Tin project comprises six towers with a total of 401 spacious apartments, each accessed via a private lift lobby. The complex also features 284 parking spaces, a four-storey clubhouse and lush tropical landscaping. Amenities include indoor and outdoor pools, and an indoor clay tennis court.
grandhomm.com

Staff Writer